Practice

INNOFOCUS

About Innofocus Customer Innovation & Practice Centre (CIPC)

The Innofocus team has long been dedicated to designing and manufacturing femtosecond laser intelligent micro and nano printing devices, and enabling the development and perfection of industrial application solutions to help scientific experts in their research work. While providing standardized and customized product, considering the reality that customers are unfamiliar with high-end precision fabrication equipment, while having diverse processing structure needs and high uncertainty of fabrication results, Innofocus established the Customer Innovation & Practice Centre (CIPC) in 2019 to focus on laser nano fabrication technology application needs, invested in laboratory space, platform, equipment and a team of engineers to support customers’ innovation practices.

Innofocus CIPC has also established a long-term research partnership with the Centre for Translational Atomaterials (CTAM) at Swinburne University of Technology, Australia, and collaborates with CTAM’s open lab research team, dedicated to building an innovative and practical platform for communication between the research community and industry. Through this platform, customers can not only experience Innofocus’ leading product features in advance, understand the performance index and processing applicability of the equipment, but also get customized design fabrication and test verification professional services, which greatly improve the efficiency of scientific research or application development and reduce the cost of trial and error.


We welcome companies and research institutions from various industries such as optical communication devices, sensor devices, microfluidic devices, optical imaging and display, plasma and metamaterials, optoelectronic devices, 2D materials, micromachining and MEMs, surface treatment and structure fabrication, and biology to contact our CIPC and jointly promote the rapid development of new applications of laser precision fabrication.

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Why Nanofabrication?

Femtosecond laser 3D nano-fabrication technology is a high-performance precision laser direct writing technology with micro- and nano-metre scale. Compared with traditional micro and nano fabrication methods based on electron beam exposure and etching process, femtosecond laser nano 3D fabrication technology is more suitable for high precision large area device arrays, capable of handling complex 3D structures, and can be formed in one go by polymer assisted or direct laser fabrication, which is of great significance for advanced optoelectronic materials, devices and micro system research and has broad application prospects. Application areas include high-performance all-optical communication devices, all-optical chips, two-dimensional material composite function sensors, wearable miniature full-spectral analysis devices, precision manufacturing, etc.

Femtosecond laser 3D nano-fabrication technology works by using a high numerical aperture microscope head to focus a high peak power femtosecond pulsed laser at the location to be fabricated, which changes the material properties within a transparent medium (e.g. glass) by triggering a nonlinear multiphoton absorption effect and introducing a refractive index difference. It is a new ultra-fine fabrication technology that combines ultrafast laser technology, microscopy technology, ultra-high precision positioning technology, 3D graphic CAD production technology and photochemical material technology.

INNOFOCUS

How do CIPC collaborate with customers

CIPC provides professional services such as demand analysis, solution design, fabrication test, effect verification, sample trial production, new application function customization, and industrial system equipment integration and development after understanding customers’ fabrication needs in detail. With reference to different elements such as work complexity, workload, and the duration of occupying equipment, some of the above services are provided free of charge, while some services are charged at a reasonable cost to the customer.

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Our Solutions

Fiber Bragg Gratting

Single-Core-Multi-Core 3D Photonics Chip Processing

Graphene oxide mid-infrared polarizer

3D In-situ Refractive Index Characterization Breakthrough in Laser Nanofabrication

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Application Gallery

Laser fabricating of polymer materials

Diffraction-limited imaging with monolayer 2D material-based ultrathin flat lenses

Resilient Graphene Ultrathin Flat Lens in Aerospace, Chemical, and Biological Harsh Environments

Free-standing graphene oxide mid-infrared polarizers

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Laser fabricating of polymer materials

Laser fabricating of polymer materials can be applied in:

  1. Complex 3D structure fabrication

  2. Biological applications

  3. Biological cells

  4. Surface relief type optical element

  5. 3D photonic crystal

  6. Optical waveguide coupler

  7. Optical biomimetics

Diffraction-limited imaging with monolayer 2D material-based ultrathin flat lenses

Ultrathin flat optics allow control of light at the subwavelength scale that is unmatched by traditional refractive optics. To approach the atomically thin limit, the use of 2D materials is an attractive possibility due to their high refractive indices. However, achievement of diffraction-limited focusing and imaging is challenged by their thickness-limited spatial resolution and focusing efficiency. Here we report a universal method to transform 2D monolayers into ultrathin flat lenses. Femtosecond laser direct writing was applied to generate local scattering media inside a monolayer, which overcomes the longstanding challenge of obtaining sufficient phase or amplitude modulation in atomically thin 2D materials. We achieved highly efficient 3D focusing with subwavelength resolution and diffraction limited imaging. The high focusing performance even allows diffraction-limited imaging at different focal positions with varying magnifications. Our work paves the way for downscaling of optical devices using 2D materials and reports an unprecedented approach for fabricating ultrathin imaging devices.


This paper was titled “Diffraction-limited imaging with monolayer 2D material-based ultrathin flat lenses” and published on Light: Science & Applications. The first author is Dr. Han Lin.

Read more:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41377-020-00374-9 

Resilient Graphene Ultrathin Flat Lens in Aerospace, Chemical, and Biological Harsh Environments

The development of ultrathin flat lenses has revolutionized the lens technologies and holds great promise for miniaturizing the conventional lens system in integrated photonic applications. In certain applications, the lenses are required to operate in harsh and/or extreme environments, for example aerospace, chemical, and biological environments. Under such circumstances, it is critical that the ultrathin flat lenses can be resilient and preserve their outstanding performance. However, the majority of the demonstrated ultrathin flat lenses are based on metal or semiconductor materials that have poor chemical, thermal, and UV stability, which limit their applications. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate a graphene ultrathin flat lens that can be applied in harsh environments for different applications, including a low Earth orbit space environment, strong corrosive chemical environments (pH = 0 and pH = 14), and biochemical environment. The graphene lenses have extraordinary environmental stability and can maintain a high level of structural integrity and outstanding focusing performance under different test conditions. Thus, it opens tremendous practical application opportunities for ultrathin flat lenses.


This paper was titled “Resilient Graphene Ultrathin Flat Lens in Aerospace, Chemical, and Biological Harsh Environments” and published on ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces. The first author is Dr. Guiyuan Cao.

Read more:

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.9b05109 

Free-standing graphene oxide mid-infrared polarizers

Mid-infrared (MIR) represents crucial spectral region for applications in spectroscopy, sensing, imaging, security and industry screening, owing to the strong characteristic vibrational transitions of many important molecules. However, the current MIR compatible materials are fragile, hazardous, and costly, which hampers the performance of MIR devices. Here, we developed a versatile transmittance-based Kramers-Kronig method and obtained the optical properties of graphene oxide in the MIR region, unveiling its application potentials as a novel MIR compatible material. As an example, we demonstrated free-standing graphene oxide MIR polarizers with large extinction ratio (~ 20 dB) and controllable working wavelength up to 25 μm, by using the low-cost and flexible direct laser writing technique. Our transmittance-based KK method offers a versatile approach to obtain the optical properties of novel atomic-scale low-dimensional materials in the less developed MIR region and opens up opportunities in high performing functional MIR devices.


This paper was titled “Free-standing graphene oxide mid-infrared polarizers” and published on Nanoscale. The first author is Xiaorui Zheng.

Read more:

https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2020/nr/d0nr01619e/unauth#!divAbstract